Report Your Usage

Reading and understanding your water meter is important in tracking and managing your groundwater use. As a permit holder, you are required to record how much Edwards Aquifer groundwater you use on a monthly and annual basis, and to report this information to the Edwards Aquifer Authority (Authority) each year. These reports should include meter readings for the amount of groundwater pumped from your well(s). Monitoring and accounting for your groundwater use throughout the year helps the Authority manage the aquifer, and can help you avoid pumping more than your annual authorized withdrawal amount—thereby saving you money.

Monthly Use Reports

How to Read Your Water Meter

Reading a water meter is similar to reading the odometer in your car. Learning how to read your meter correctly can help you identify leaks and discover ways to conserve water. Of the many types of meters used on the market, the following examples include three of the more common meters used throughout the region.

Example #1

How to Read Your Water Meter Example 1On the face of the meter there is a large dial and a display of numbers. Read and record the number display from left to right exactly as it appears, including any fixed zeros to the right of the number shown. The face of the meter indicates this meter reads in gallons.

Meter #1 (above) reads 1,857,030 total gallons. Notice that the zero at the end is included in the reading, and no decimal points have been added.

To convert this number to acre-feet, divide the total gallons by 325,851 (325,851 equals one acre-foot).

For example: 1,857,030 ÷ 325,851 = 5.699 total acre-feet

Example #2

How to Read Your Water Meter Example 2On the face of the meter there is a large dial and a display of numbers. Read and record the number display from left to right exactly as it appears, including any fixed zeros to the right of the number shown. The face of the meter indicates this meter reads in gallons.

Meter #2 reads 43,059,700 total gallons. Notice that the set zeros at the end of the dial are included in the reading, and no decimal points have been added.

To convert this number to acre-feet, divide the total gallons by 325,851 (325,851 equals one acre-foot). For example: 43,059,700 ÷ 325,851 = 132.145 total acre-feet

Example #3

How to Read Your Water Meter Example 3

The dial reads 183750 and the face of the meter indicates this meter reads in acre-feet X .001

Therefore, Meter #3 reads 183.750 acre-feet

Determining Your Water Use

To determine your water use for the period of time between two readings, subtract the first reading from the second to find out how much water was used during that time. For example, to determine your annual use subtract your January 1 meter reading from your December 31 meter reading.

If you need assistance reading your meter or if you believe your meter may not be reporting accurately, please contact the Authority’s Meter Program as soon as possible. A member of the Meter Program can be reached at (210) 222-2204 or (800) 292-1047.

Tamper Detection Devices

Permit holders should have recently received a letter in the mail informing them of rules adopted by the EAA regarding the installation of tamper detection devices on all permitted well flow meters across the region. As outlined in the rules, these tamper detection devices “may not hinder the day-to-day maintenance or emergency repairs of the pipe upon which the meter is installed and shall be consistent with state and federal regulations.” In the event a permit holder encounters an issue with their meter(s), they can simply cut the device.  If such action is required, the permit holder should immediately contact someone from the Meter Program and report the incident. The device installed at all meters is a simple thin wire or cable measuring from 13”- 39” in length.  The cable is routed through a hole in a plastic tube that locks the wire in place. These cables contain a barcode and are numbered for tracking purposes. In some situations, the configuration of your meter installation may require the use of a different form of tamper detection device to accommodate your particular meter.

Steel Flow Blue Tube Project

During the month of October 2013 through September 2014, EAA Meter Program staff will be coordinating with well owners to replace deteriorated steel flow blue tubes at several locations throughout the region. The purpose for these installations is to help ensure permit holders are getting accurate readings on their meters, which helps to prevent water waste - especially during periods of water reductions.  The EAA’s intention is to minimize any inconvenience to the permit holder.  Therefore, permit holders will be contacted prior to initiation of the installation process.  Meter Program staff has already identified specific wells that require the replacement of steel flow blue tubes, but permit holders are encouraged to inform us if they suspect any minor or major leaks are occurring from current equipment.

Meter Accuracy Verification

A rule that took effect in 2013 requires all municipal and industrial users authorized to withdraw more than 28 acre-feet of water annually to perform or have performed an accuracy verification test for each meter at least every four years after initial meter installation. For informational purposes, the EAA has provided a list of possible vendors that a meter owner may contact for this service, but it is the sole responsibility of the owner to make all necessary arrangements for accuracy verification.

For additional information, please contact a member of the Meter Program at (210) 222-2204 or (800) 292-1047.